ON SALE: “As You Wish” (February 2017)

Tickets for SET’s next production, the world premiere of “As You Wish”, an improvised Twu Wuv parody inspired by the Princess Bride, are NOW ON SALE at Brown Paper Tickets. Performances Feb 2 – 14, adult tickets start at $21. Click here to buy tickets now!

Presenting “As You Wish”

Seattle Experimental Theater is proud to present its latest original improvised play: As You Wish, a parody inspired by The Princess Bride. During every performance, the cast will combine suggestions from the audience with the beloved story of The Princess Bride – creating a hilarious and heartfelt show. Join us for danger, adventure and of course, Tru Wuv, all inspired by the audience. As You Wish is created and directed by Paul Levy and is presented in association with Theatre Off Jackson.

Performance Date

Feb 2 – 11: Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays (ages 8 and up)
Feb 14: Special Valentine’s Day Encore (ages 12 and up)
Doors open 7:30PM, Curtain 8PM

Ticket Prices

Save money on advance tickets at Brown Paper Tickets:
$21 General Admission
$16 Students under 12 and Seniors over 60

DOOR PRICES:
$25 General Admission
$20 Students under 12 and Seniors over 60

Special Valentine’s Day Encore

Join us on Tuesday, February 14 for a special performance of “As You Wish” heavy on the romance. This specific performance is recommended for ages 12 and up. Ticket price includes complimentary chocolate.

ADVANCE: $31/ ticket, $62 for couples online.
AT THE DOOR: $35 Single Tickets; $70 for couples

NEW SHOW: “As You Wish” (February 2017)

20161129-_65a7039-2Seattle Experimental Theater is excited to reveal the first show in our 2017 season! As You Wish is a world premiere improvised parody inspired by the world of the cult classic book/film “The Princess Bride”.

PERFORMANCES

February 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, and a special Valentine’s Day Performance February 14th.
All performances at 8PM.
Tickets coming soon!

VENUE

As You Wish will be performed at (and in partnership with) Theatre Off Jackson in Seattle’s International District.

ABOUT THE SHOW

As You Wish is supported by a small cast of improvisers that are willing to take risks, play, and ultimately have fun together telling a timeless love story fraught with notable perils. The production features improvisers that are light, playful, and comfortable breaking the rules and inviting the audience along the journey with them – the fourth wall is there to be broken.

CAST AND CREW

Directed and created by Paul Levy (Where No Man Has Gone Before).
The cast features Marc Guy (The Journal), Amalia Larson, Ryan Miller, Christine Riippi (Wedding Horror Stories, The Wolf and the Witch), Jessica Robins, Jaclyn Schuenzel, Kayla Teel, and John Wachter.

Wedding Horror Stories at Winter Wonderprov

We’re pleased to announce that the cast of our original 2013 improvised comedy Wedding Horror Stories will be bringing their work to Jet City Improv’s “Winter Wonderprov” variety show to help raise money for those in Seattle who find themselves in need this holiday season. This one-night-only festival features 5 different indie groups from around the Seattle improv scene.

Join us:
Sunday December 11, 2016 at 7pm at Jet City Improv (in Seattle’s University District)
Tickets start at $20 (proceeds go to Seattle Times Fund for the Needy)
For tickets and more information, visit the Jet City Improv website.

WORKSHOP: Can’t We All Get Along? January 21

Join us for Seattle Experimental Theater’s next improv workshop – learn from our veterans as they share their expertise and unique perspectives.

“Can’t We All Get Along” with Tony Beeman will be offered on January 21, 2016 from 1 – 4PM. Spaces are limited and advance registration is required. Class fee is $45. The class is recommended for advanced and intermediate improvisers with at least some performing experience.

Tickets available at Brown Paper Tickets.

CLASS DESCRIPTION

Theatre, literature, cinema and real life are all filled with people who get along. People who fall in love, maintain friendships, help each other out, and build a better society. The same can’t always be said for improvised scenes. Improvised characters spend a lot of time fighting, disagreeing, or betraying each other. It can be hard for improvisers to find tension without reaching for external conflict.

This workshop will explore internal conflict and find different sorts of tensions. We will work with scenes between characters who like each other, who fall in love, and who genuinely want to help. We’ll explore characters who are at war with themselves, not with someone else. We’ll look at off-stage conflict, and how on-stage characters can embody that conflict in interesting ways. We’ll also explore how to create mixed relationships: odd couples, relationships of grudging respect, love/hate relationships, and characters who fall in love with the worst possible choice.

These tools are important building blocks for long form and also a great way to vary your short form work.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

Tony Beeman has been improvising, teaching, and directing in Seattle for over ten years. He makes his improv home at Unexpected Productions, where he serves as Artistic Associate, and teaches the Performance 600 class. He performs regularly with Seattle Experimental Theater (Where No Man Has Gone Before, The Doctor, Time’s Arrow). He is a founding member of NERDProv, Seattle’s geekiest improv group, and can be seen on HyperRPG’s Shadowrun Twitch Show, Corporate SINs. He likes to watch characters fall in love more than anything.

Time’s Arrow: Behind the Scenes with Christine Riippi

Time’s Arrow CLOSES this weekend – see it Oct 20, 21 and 22 at 8PM at the Ballard Underground in Seattle. Tickets available at Brown Paper Tickets.

Christine Riippi first performed with Seattle Experimental Theater in the cast of 2013’s “Wedding Horror Stories”, followed by “The Wolf and the Witch” (2014/2015). She is now appearing in Time’s Arrow through October 22, and shared her thoughts below on the experience and the show through her mother’s eyes.

“My Mom Liked It!” by Christine Riippi

A couple months ago, I saw an audition posting for Seattle Experimental Theater’s newest show, “Time’s Arrow”. Along with the usual time, date, and contact information, there was a brief description of the show: “The spaces around us are full of history and potential; haunted by ghosts and gilded by dreams. Halls and streets and fields are rich with meaning defined by wonderful, terrible, forgettable, and sublime individual and collective experiences, yet we exist in them for only one moment at a time.” Well, that sounded incredibly interesting, intense, and slightly wacky. And like nothing I had ever seen on stage, especially in an improvised show. So I signed up and hoped to find out a little more about this mysterious “Time’s Arrow”.

Fast forward to Opening Night. My mom was to attend and I was explaining the premise of the show to her as we carpooled to the Ballard Underground. As a dedicated supporter of my improv habit, she has been to her share of shows where the performers do not memorize lines. Not every show has stuck the landing (“It was fun, but I liked ‘Wicked’ – remember ‘Wicked’? She flew!”), and now know to brief her before each show so she will know what to expect.

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Christine Riippi (L) and Sarah Scheller (R) in SET’s world premiere production of “Time’s Arrow”.

“So it’s a time travel show?” she asked.
“Sort of,” I answered, “But more like time-hopping. There’s no time machine or anything like that.”
“And you stay in the same place?”
“Yeah, we show big moments and events that happen in the same space, but it’s at any point in time. They might overlap, but they might not. So you could see when the place was built, or when it burned down, or when the space aliens invaded in the year 3046.”
“And you make it up as you go?” (A classic question, familiar to any improviser.)
“Yup!”

I do not know if my explanation was satisfactory or if it just confused her more. But this is improv; I have no idea what it is going to be “about” until we are in it. Luckily, the show went off without a hitch. The audience did not leave and nobody threw perishables at the performers, so I counted it as a win. When I found my mom after the show, I asked, “What’d you think?” Her answer delighted me: “That was one of the best shows I’ve seen!”

Okay, I know what you’re thinking. I am her daughter and she loves me and wouldn’t tell me anything other than good things. Maybe you’re right. But then she went on to compliment specific moments in the show and characters she liked, plus shared her ideas on what she thought might have happened in the location during the specific time periods we didn’t portray in the show. She even added, “I’m going to come back next weekend – I want to suggest the place!”

For the remainder of the weekend we enjoyed lovely audiences, including a group of fearless souls who braved Seattle’s Storm of the Century on Saturday night. Over the course of three days, we explored a parsonage in the Cayman Islands, the original tasting room at the Jack Daniel’s distillery in Tennessee, and saw several versions of Seattle’s own Salty’s on Alki. We created moments of adventure, sadness, romance, terror, and even a little whimsy, all occurring throughout the life of the location.

This show is a reminder that we are merely a brief chapter in the story of the places around us. We are just passing through. After this weekend, the show will be closed, but it will exist in time as a part of the story of Seattle Experimental Theater and the Ballard Underground. Even after weeks of rehearsals and several performances, “Time’s Arrow” is still like nothing I have ever seen or participated in onstage. The best way to understand what we’re creating and doing up there, is to come by and see it. It is wonderfully original, not to mention entertaining. But don’t take my word for it. Just ask my mom. She’ll be there on Saturday night.

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